STORE

Welcome to our Web Stores. These two locations offer a sampling of our over 40000 new and used LPs, CDs, Books, and DVDs in stock. Our AMAZON and EBAY stores here mainly feature local and regional and band direct items and a smorgasbord of some of our tastier collectible and out of print VINYL and CDS.

  • NEW RELEASES, 3/17: GARY CLARK JR, SPOON, DEPECHE MODE, CONOR OBERST, RICK ROSS, TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND & a 50th anniversary reissue of a landmark ZOMBIES album!
    The title track of Hot Thoughts starts like a Kraftwerk tune: electronic drone, metronomic beats and clipped robotic vocals. Then the guitars crash in, and you're reminded almost no one engineers post-punk propulsion into precision-tuned rock-and-roll melody better than Spoon auteur Britt Daniel. Nearly 25 years in, his group has made maybe their best record yet – a line that been repeated, accurately enough, with most every record they've made.
  • NEW RELEASES 3/24: Holy cow, do we have lot of new stuff, from ODDISEE, DREW HOLCOMB, JESUS & MARY CHAIN, CRAIG FINN, RUTHIE FOSTER, and a bunch of jazz/classical titles for Gene!
    Oddisee, a Maryland native and Brooklyn transplant, has been one of the country’s top independent hip-hop producers for more than half a decade, amassing a sizeable fan base out of the rap nostalgists and beatheads attracted to his mellow, expansive instrumentals. But his new record marks a first; the rapping on The Iceberg—fluid, dynamic and above all, thoughtful—finally matches the pull and urgency of his production. In the past, a solemn chorus of horns and bass, like the one on Iceberg opener “Digging Deep,” may have outstripped the lyrical overlay. Here, though, the music provides a backdrop for Oddisee to explain the album’s premise: Our actions are only comprehensible once you understand the circumstances that have shaped our respective characters. The Iceberg zeroes in on those circumstances, while serving up another selection of near-perfect beats. On the clear standout, “You Grew Up,” one verse traces the divergent paths of Oddisee and a white friend who grows up to become a murderous police officer; another examines a man whose self-loathing leads him to radical Islam. Oddisee offers a complex portrait of both men, and his storytelling is complemented by sharp lyrical asides. The Iceberg uses dynamic narratives to avoid the sanctimony that has stained the genre, pairing Odd’s always-reliable board work with a new commitment to lyrical exploration.